How to approach content writing

Share information in a way that is respectful and collaborative as opposed to an 'expert who is telling'.  Consider using 'we' rather than 'you'. Don’t overcomplicate the content with unnecessarily formal language.

It is important to remember your audience - professional adults will have different absorption rates of content then school-aged children

Tips for creating pathways

  • The big picture: Be clear about the overall aim of the pathway. That is, the purpose that all modules are working towards.
  • Chunks: Decide on the best way to partition the big picture into learning sized chunks (modules).
  • Present the purpose: Outline the benefits and learning goals of each module at the outset. Adult learners want to know the relevance of what they are learning to what they want to achieve.
  • Chunk information: Smaller pieces of information are easier to process and remember. If you have a lot of information to convey, think about creating a short video (voice-over PowerPoint works well) or embedding a PDF.
  • Sequence thoughtfully. Generally, the aim of a module is for a learner to be self-sufficient in the concept or skill by the end of that module. Sequence the module from more to less structure and support in terms of answering questions or solving problems. 
  • Language: Share information in a way that is respectful and collaborative as opposed to an 'expert who is telling'. Consider using 'we' rather than 'you'. Don’t overcomplicate the content with unnecessarily formal language, but also don’t use patronisingly simple language.
  • Self-reflection: Provide opportunities for learners to self-reflect. For example, self-assessing by comparing their response to a model answer encourages self-reflection.
  • Relevance: Use examples that link to the learners’ existing knowledge and experience.
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